WRITING RADICALS IN RATIONAL EXPONENT FORM

When serious work needs to be done with radicals,
they are usually changed to a name that uses exponents,
so that the exponent laws can be used.
Also, this new name for radicals allows them to be approximated on any calculator that has a power key.

Here are the rational exponent names for radicals:

[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\sqrt{x} = x^{1/2}$

[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\root 3\of{x} = x^{1/3}$

[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\root 4\of{x} = x^{1/4}$

[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\root 5\of{x} = x^{1/5}$

and so on!

Regardless of the name used, the normal restrictions apply.
For example, [beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\,x^{1/2}\,$ is only defined for [beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\,x\ge 0\,$.

EXAMPLES:

Write in rational exponent form:

[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\root 7\of {x} = x^{1/7}$
[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\sqrt{x^3} = (x^3)^{1/2} = x^{3/2}$
[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\displaystyle\frac{1}{\sqrt{x}} = \frac{1}{x^{1/2}} = x^{-1/2}$
[beautiful math coming... please be patient] $\displaystyle\frac{3}{\root 5\of{x}} = \frac{3}{x^{1/5}} = 3x^{-1/5}$
Master the ideas from this section
by practicing the exercise at the bottom of this page.

When you're done practicing, move on to:
Writing Rational Exponents as Radicals
CONCEPT QUESTIONS EXERCISE:
On this exercise, you will not key in your answer.
However, you can check to see if your answer is correct.
PROBLEM TYPES:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
AVAILABLE MASTERED IN PROGRESS

Write in rational exponent form:
(MAX is 12; there are 12 different problem types.)